Should I Lock or Float? FED Minutes Reveal Rates Should Climb Before Years End

Federal Reserve to Meet this weekFOMC Minutes Suggest QE Tapering by Year-End

Ben Bernanke, Fed Chairman, blew up the bond and mortgage markets a month ago with his comments that the Fed is preparing to begin reducing the monthly purchases of treasuries and mortgage-backed securities. Rates spiked, and left folks shopping for mortgages, shaking their heads. The minutes for June’s meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) suggest that committee members are mostly in agreement that the current quantitative easing program (QE) should begin winding down by year-end, but the committee minutes are very clear about the committee’s intention to monitor inflation and ongoing economic and financial developments before taking action to reduce the current rate of QE. Continue reading “Should I Lock or Float? FED Minutes Reveal Rates Should Climb Before Years End”

Explanation Of The Fed Statement Today (December 12 , 2012)

Putting the FOMC statement in plain EnglishThe Federal Open Market Committee voted to leave the Fed Funds Rate unchanged within its current target range of 0.000-0.250 percent Wednesday.

For the tenth consecutive meeting, the FOMC vote was nearly unanimous. Richmond Federal Reserve President Jeffrey Lacker was the lone dissenter in the 9-1 vote. Continue reading “Explanation Of The Fed Statement Today (December 12 , 2012)”

What Mortgage Rates Are Doing This Week: Shoud I Lock Or Float?

Freddie Mac 30-year fixed rate mortgage ratesMortgage-backed securities (MBS) improved a bit last week, and rates remain near all-time low’s, continuing this year’s Refinance Boom and giving fuel to the budding housing market recovery. Continue reading “What Mortgage Rates Are Doing This Week: Shoud I Lock Or Float?”

Why Are Rates Getting Worse Today? (August 1 , 2012)

Putting the FOMC statement in plain EnglishAfter the The Federal Open Market Committee voted to leave the Fed Funds Rate unchanged this morning, mortgage rates got worse. Why? The vote was nearly unanimous (9-1 vote).

In its press release, the Federal Reserve noted that the U.S. economy has “decelerated somewhat” since January. Beyond the next few quarters, though, the Fed expects growth to “remain moderate” and then gradually pick up. Remember, when there is bad news for the economy, rates improve. And when there is good to moderate news, rates get worse (see video explanation). Continue reading “Why Are Rates Getting Worse Today? (August 1 , 2012)”

A Simple Explanation Of Bernanke’s Statement Today (April 25, 2012)

Putting the FOMC statement in plain EnglishThe Federal Open Market Committee voted to leave the Fed Funds Rate unchanged within its current target range of 0.000-0.250 percent Wednesday.

For the fifth consecutive month, the Fed Funds Rate vote was nearly unanimous. Just one FOMC member, Richmond Federal Reserve President Jeffrey Lacker, dissented in the 9-1 vote.

The Fed Funds Rate has been near zero percent since December 2008. It is expected to stay near-zero through 2014, at least. Continue reading “A Simple Explanation Of Bernanke’s Statement Today (April 25, 2012)”